Thursday, July 27, 2017

Scary mobile wireless flaw lets hackers track your cellphone's location..


If you're like a lot of people, you've probably worried for many years about other parties spying on you. Maybe it's a weird and persistent feeling that somebody's tracking or watching you each time you make a phone call or go online.

In our modern-day ultra connected world, the snoop could be anyone - advertisers, the government, hackers - with the right equipment, spying is quite a real-world possibility.

In fact, we told you about a device called a StingRay, which is essentially a portable, luggage-sized cellphone tower. Once they have a good idea where you are, snoops can switch to a portable device to track you down, to as precisely as a specific room in a building.

Older cellphones that use 2G connections were extremely vulnerable to Stingrays because of the 2G standard's weak encryption. With the introduction of the newer 3G and 4G LTE standards, the common belief is that this weakness has been remedied with stronger encryption. But is this still true?

Investments In IoT Security Mean Solution Providers Better Be Ready..


As Internet of Things security threats continue to rise, solution providers and vendors say they are starting to see the tide turn when it comes to real investments in IoT security technologies.

The comments come as the Black Hat 2017 conference in Las Vegas highlighted some of the latest threats against IoT devices, including attacks on smart locks, critical infrastructure, cars, smart buildings, industrial robots, radiation monitoring devices and more.

They also come after multiple high-profile IoT attacks in recent months, most notably with the Mirai botnet DDoS attacks launched through IoT devices including webcams, routers and video recorders.