Sunday, January 15, 2017

The Light Phone...Possible New "Anti-Spy" Phone??



Note: Not sure how the 2G sunset will effect this emerging product, but hopefully they have it all figured out. ~JDL

The Light Phone is a discreet credit card sized mobile phone designed to be used as little as possible. It is the only phone designed to be used as your second phone as a seamless extension of you smartphone. It is an unlocked 2G GSM phone that works independent of your current plan, but using our unique software platform it can keep your same phone number. The Light Phone is easily set up and controlled via an app on your computer. Other features are limited to nine speed dials and a time display. 

An active SIM is required because the phone is not tethered, it will work regardless of where your smartphone is. The cost of using our service is approximately $5/month in the United States. 


Read more here.

Friday, January 13, 2017

WhatsApp vulnerability allows snooping on encrypted messages..

A security vulnerability that can be used to allow Facebook and others to intercept and read encrypted messages has been found within its WhatsApp messaging service.

Facebook claims that no one can intercept WhatsApp messages, not even the company and its staff, ensuring privacy for its billion-plus users. But new research shows that the company could in fact read messages due to the way WhatsApp has implemented its end-to-end encryption protocol. Privacy campaigners said the vulnerability is a “huge threat to freedom of speech” and warned it could be used by government agencies as a backdoor to snoop on users who believe their messages to be secure.

WhatsApp has made privacy and security a primary selling point, and has become a go to communications tool of activists, dissidents and diplomats.

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

"Spy Toys" that use voice recognition tech to “listen” to the kids that play with them..

These particular toys — basically a “girl” and “boy” theme on the same core idea — both use voice recognition tech to “listen” to the kids that play with them.
They connect via Bluetooth to a mobile phone app, usually belonging to a parent, and then from there access the internet in order to interact with kids and answer their questions. To accomplish that feat, the apps record and collect conversations between the toys and the kids, and use speech-to-text protocols to turn kids’ questions into searchable queries. 
View Video below.




Friday, November 25, 2016

Delete yourself from the internet by pressing this button..

The internet can be a beautiful and horrible place at the same time, and it isn’t weird to sometimes feel like you want to leave — there’s wasn’t an easy way out, until now.
Swedish developers Wille Dahlbo and Linus Unneb├Ąck created Deseat.me, which offers a way to wipe your entire existence off the internet in a few clicks.
When logging into the website with a Google account it scans for apps and services you’ve created an account for, and creates a list of them with easy delete links.

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Hack the Army: US military begs white hats to sweep it for bugs..

Security experts reckon the US government’s newly unveiled "Hack the Army" bug bounty programme may usher in greater co-operation across the whole arena of security research.

The US Army will offer cash rewards to hackers who find vulnerabilities in selected, public-facing Army websites under the scheme, which builds on the US military’s previous "Hack the Pentagon" programme.

The Hack the Pentagon programme gave security researchers the chance to earn money by finding bugs on static websites that “weren't operationally significant as targets”. Hack the Army goes one step further by inviting security researchers to look for flaws in websites that offer dynamic exchanges of personal identifiable information, sites considered central to the Army's recruiting mission.

Chris Lynch, the US Department of Defense's head of Digital Service, said: ”Hack the Army [will show] that bringing in creative hackers from a wide variety of backgrounds can fundamentally improve the way we protect our soldiers and secure our systems."

New Malware Turns Headphones into Makeshift Microphones to Record Your Conversations

Mark Zuckerberg made headlines earlier this year for tapping his webcam and microphone. While he forgot the security 101 of not reusing old passwords, the Facebook CEO was definitely paranoid of someone trying to spy on him more than someone hacking his LinkedIn or Pinterest accounts.
Spying makes everyone uncomfortable. Are those so-called IoT devices really surveilling on you? Should you tape up your webcam and microphone slot? The paranoia would see no end because there’s no end to the lengths an attacker could go to spy on their targets. Now, a group of Israeli researchers at Ben Gurion University have given us yet another reason to freak out with malware that converts your headphones into microphones that can record your conversations.
Researchers demonstrated the hack in a video, using a malware they are calling “Speak(a)r” to hijack a computer to record audio, even when the target device’s microphone has been disabled or entirely removed. This malware tweaks the speakers in the earbuds to turn them into makeshift microphones, covertly listening to you.

Friday, November 18, 2016

Spray-on conductive concrete will shield us from EMP attacks..

You don't have to build that Faraday cage after all.

While the threat of an EMP attack knocking out electronics and sending the world into an apocalyptic spiral seems far off, it's good to know that someone is working to protect us from it anyway. University of Nebraska engineers Christopher Tuan and Lim Nguyen have successfully created a cost-effective concrete mix that acts as a shield against "intense pulses of electromagnetic energy" and protects any electronic devices inside.

The EMP-proof concrete has actually been adapted from Tuan and Nguyen's previous -- and slightly more pedestrian -- breakthrough: self-warming concrete that can melt ice and snow with a safe, low-level electrical current. The pair was originally working on a way to build safer roads and bridges when they realized their new concrete could also block electromagnetic energy.