Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Inside Oracle’s cloak-and-dagger political war with Google

Oracle has lobbied aggressively — and seeded negative stories about its search foe — as the two battle in court.

The story that appeared in Quartz this November seemed shocking enough on its own: Google had quietly tracked the location of its Android users, even those who had turned off such monitoring on their smartphones.

But missing from the news site’s report was another eyebrow-raising detail: Some of its evidence, while accurate, appears to have been furnished by one of Google’s fiercest foes: Oracle.

For the past year, the software and cloud computing giant has mounted a cloak-and-dagger, take-no-prisoners lobbying campaign against Google, perhaps hoping to cause the company intense political and financial pain at a time when the two tech giants are also warring in federal court over allegations of stolen computer code.

Since 2010, Oracle has accused Google of copying Java and using key portions of it in the making of Android. Google, for its part, has fought those claims vigorously. More recently, though, their standoff has intensified. And as a sign of the worsening rift between them, this summer Oracle tried to sell reporters on a story about the privacy pitfalls of Android, two sources confirmed to Recode.

Read more here.

https://www.recode.net/2017/12/6/16721364/oracle-google-political-war-location-track-android-safra-catz-java-lawsuit

Monday, October 23, 2017

Professional spy catchers in demand for bug-sweeping

*Note: Have you wondered if you need a sweep?
Don't wait, contact us today we can help. JDL~

In the trade it is known as TSCM but everyone else calls it bug-sweeping. It is not cockroaches that these pest controllers are hunting but eavesdropping devices that could be hidden anywhere from a mobile phone to the cable in the back of a computer.

Demand for the services of professional technical surveillance countermeasures specialists has grown dramatically along with public awareness of the dangers. Britain’s professional spy catchers have never been busier as businesses and wealthy individuals realise that they are being watched and listened to.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

Scary mobile wireless flaw lets hackers track your cellphone's location..


If you're like a lot of people, you've probably worried for many years about other parties spying on you. Maybe it's a weird and persistent feeling that somebody's tracking or watching you each time you make a phone call or go online.

In our modern-day ultra connected world, the snoop could be anyone - advertisers, the government, hackers - with the right equipment, spying is quite a real-world possibility.

In fact, we told you about a device called a StingRay, which is essentially a portable, luggage-sized cellphone tower. Once they have a good idea where you are, snoops can switch to a portable device to track you down, to as precisely as a specific room in a building.

Older cellphones that use 2G connections were extremely vulnerable to Stingrays because of the 2G standard's weak encryption. With the introduction of the newer 3G and 4G LTE standards, the common belief is that this weakness has been remedied with stronger encryption. But is this still true?

Investments In IoT Security Mean Solution Providers Better Be Ready..


As Internet of Things security threats continue to rise, solution providers and vendors say they are starting to see the tide turn when it comes to real investments in IoT security technologies.

The comments come as the Black Hat 2017 conference in Las Vegas highlighted some of the latest threats against IoT devices, including attacks on smart locks, critical infrastructure, cars, smart buildings, industrial robots, radiation monitoring devices and more.

They also come after multiple high-profile IoT attacks in recent months, most notably with the Mirai botnet DDoS attacks launched through IoT devices including webcams, routers and video recorders.

Monday, May 15, 2017

Infrastructure vulnerabilities make surveillance easy..

Weakness in digital communications systems allows security to be bypassed, leaving users at risk of being spied on.



Governments want to spy on their citizens for all sorts of reasons. Some countries do it to help solve crimes or to try to find "terrorists" before they act.
Others do it to find and arrest reporters or dissidents. Some only target individuals, others attempt to spy on everyone all the time.
Many countries spy on the citizens of other countries: for reasons of national security, for advantages in trade negotiations, or to steal intellectual property.
None of this is new. What is new, however, is how easy it has all become. Computers naturally produce data about their activities, which means they're constantly producing surveillance data about us as we interact with them.
Corporations are doing it for their own purposes; collecting and using this data has become the dominant business model of the internet. Increasingly, governments around the world are ensuring that they too have access to the data, either by mandating that the companies give it to them or surreptitiously grabbing their own copy.

Sunday, May 14, 2017

Corporate spying costs billions, can it be stopped?

Hotel giant Hilton wanted to develop an all-new luxury hotel chain called Denizen to satisfy a growing market for high-end accommodations. Its competitor Starwood thought Denizen seemed very similar to its successful W chain. Too similar. And in 2009 Starwood Hotels & Resorts filed a corporate espionage lawsuit against Hilton, claiming two former executives who left to work at Hilton stole, and recruited others to steal, more than 100,000 documents full of sensitive information.
The documents, Starwood said, included trade secrets like a step-by-step guide to creating a new luxury brand from the ground up. Starwood said the name Denizen itself came from a concept Starwood developed for the W chain called the "zen den." In the end, Hilton settled with Starwood for $75 million and had to drop the Denizen brand. Hilton did not admit wrongdoing as part of the settlement, saying in a statement, "Hilton Worldwide regrets the circumstances surrounding the dispute with Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide and is pleased to bring an end to this prolonged litigation."

Monday, April 24, 2017

Top app has been spying on users and lying about it..

Uber, the ride-hailing service, is having a bad year. Last month, a secret Uber program called Greyball was exposed and it revealed how the company uses data collected from its app to evade authorities in areas where the service is resisted by law enforcement or banned.

Greyball was allegedly used in cities like Las Vegas, Boston and Paris, plus in countries like China, Australia and South Korea, to deny service to Uber accounts considered as a threat to the company.

Now, another controversy has surfaced and it involves a tussle with a company that Uber can't afford to irk.

The New York Times reported that in early 2015, Uber CEO Travis Kalanick met with Apple's Tim Cook to discuss specific questionable techniques the Uber app was allegedly employing.

Apple engineers discovered that the app was tracking its users even after it was deleted from iPhones. This practice, called "fingerprinting," violates Apple's privacy guidelines. "Fingerprinting" assigns each iPhone a specific identity via a small piece of code that persists even after the device's data has been wiped.