Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Attackers Get Sneakier With Encrypted Malware

pcworld.com


Malware just got sneaky! Well, sneakier, that is. Attackers in Brazil have found a way to sneak around antivirus programs by using cryptography.
Recently Dmitry BestuzhevKaspersky Lab's Head of Global Research and Analysis Team for Latin America, was looking over some potentially malicious links from Brazil when he discovered some files with .jpeg filename extensions. At first glance, Bestuzhev thought that they were some form ofsteganography--the art and science of hiding messages. But upon further inspection, the reseacher discovered that they were actually more like .bmp (bitmap) files, than JPEGs.
The data contained within the files themselves was obviously encrypted and contained some kind of malware; Bestuzhev later discovered that the data was in the form of block ciphers--a cryptographic method that encrypts 128-bit blocks of plain text in to 128-bit blocks of cipher text. Since block ciphers can only be composed of 128-bit blocks, they must break up the message into several blocks and encrypt each one individually. A process called modes of operationallows a cryptographer to repeatedly use block ciphers to encrypt an entire program--or piece of malware, in this case.

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